Lily Fein and Josephine Burr: Articulating Space

July 10 – August 7, 2021

Josephine Burrs 7 Sculpture Series 

Left: Column 

$2,000

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Right: Sphere

$1,800

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Back: Basket

SOLD

Front: Lily Feins Pink Venus 

$2,050

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Middle: Josephine Burr's Trough 

SOLD

Back: Josephine Burr's Untitiled (black wrapped line)

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Front: Lily Fein's Pink Cloud Vessel 

$2,800 

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Back: Lily Fein's Green Venus 

$2,250

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Front: Lily Fein's Dark Venus Pair 

$2,800 

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Back: Josephine Burr's 7 Volumes Series 

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Josephine Burr's An alphabet of makeshift days, #3 (tendering)

$2,200

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Lily Fein

Half Venus

Porcelain

14h x 7w x 3d in

LF093

$ 1,800.00

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Lily Fein

Green Venus

Porcelain

21h x 9.50w x 3.50d in

LF091

$ 2,250.00

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Lily Fein

Dark Venus Pair

Porcelain

18h x 8w x 3d in

LF104

$ 2,800.00

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Lily Fein

Pink Venus

21h x 9w x 2.50d in

LF092

$ 2,050.00

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Lily Fein

Vein Vase

Porcelain, Glaze

Framed: 5h x 7w x 4.50d in

LF103

$ 1,250.00

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Lily Fein

Pink Cloud Vessel

23h x 8.50w x 8.50d in

LF097

$ 2,800.00

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Lily Fein

Flow Vase

Porcelain

18h x 14w x 14d in

LF096

$ 2,250.00

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Lily Fein

Vessel

15h x 15w x 15d in

LF095

$ 1,800.00

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Lily Fein

Bowl

14h x 11w x 14d in

LF094

$ 1,400.00

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Lily Fein

Large Stippled Vase, Black Exterior; White Interior

Porcelain

14h x 4w x 6d in

LF090

$1,600

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Josephine Burr

An alphabet of makeshift days, #1 (promenade)

Porcelain, thermoplastic clay, wood

JB004

$2,200

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Josephine Burr

An alphabet of makeshift days, #3 (tendering), 2021

Porcelain, Thermoplastic Clay, Wood

18h x 36w x 6d in

JB005

$ 2,200.00

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Josephine Burr

An alphabet of makeshift days, #4 (nightfall), 2021

Porcelain, thermoplastic clay, flashe, wood

19h x 36w x 6d in

JB024

$ 2,200.00

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Josephine Burr

Untitled (small loop cup)

Porcelain

4h x 4w x 3d in

JB021

$ 200.00

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Josephine Burr

Untitled (scarred bottle)

Porcelain

12h x 4w x 4d in

JB022

$ 450.00

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Josephine Burr

Untitled (stump)

7h x 7w x 7d in

JB018

$ 750.00

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Josephine Burr

Untitled (spouted column)

Porcelain

6h x 8w x 3d in

JB020

$ 300.00

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Josephine Burr

Untitled (soft body)

Porcelain, thermoplastic clay

10h x 7w x 6d in

JB019

$ 700.00

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Josephine Burr

Untitled (wedge)

Porcelain

Framed: 6h x 14w x 4d in

JB023

$ 750.00

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Josephine Burr

Untitled (pink wrap loop)

Porcelain, thermoplastic clay

9h x 5w x 3d in

JB017

$ 350.00

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Josephine Burr

Untitiled (black wrapped line)

Porcelain, thermoplastic clay

8h x 5w x 3d in

JB016

$ 250.00

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Josephine Burr

Seven Volumes (Sphere/Jar), 2021

Pinched terra cotta, terra sigillata

22h x 22w x 18d in

JB010

$ 1,800.00

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Josephine Burr

Seven Volumes (Column), 2021

Pinched terra cotta, terra sigillata

20h x 21w x 25d in

JB009

$ 2,000.00

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Josephine Burr

Seven Volumes (Bucket II), 2021

Pinched terra cotta, terra sigillata

20h x 21w x 19d in

JB008

$ 1,800.00

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Josephine Burr

Seven Volumes (Bucket I)

Pinched terra cotta, terra sigillata

22h x 23w x 18d in

JB007

$ 1,800.00

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Josephine Burr

Seven Volumes (Basin), 2021

Pinched terra cotta, terra sigillata

33” x 20” x 12”

JB006

$ 1,800.00

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Josephine Burr

Seven Volumes (Basket)

Pinched terra cotta, terra sigillata

17h x 26w x 24d in

JB001

$ 2,000.00

SOLD

Josephine Burr

Seven Volumes (Trough), 2021

Pinched terra cotta, terra sigillata, milk paint

13h x 32w x 10d in

JB011

SOLD

Josephine Burr

Sphere Jar (left)
Column (back)
Basin(front), 2021

Terracotta

JB002

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Lily Fein

Chartreuse Teapot

Porcelain

7h x 6w x 6d in

LF098

$ 450.00

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Lily Fein

Fin Cups

Porcelain

4h x 3w x 3d in

LF100

$ 270.00 ($ 90.00 each)

Inquire

Press Release

Articulating Space will transition to an online exhibition on Saturday, July 17th to accommodate gallery renovations.

Lucy Lacoste Gallery is pleased to present Lily Fein and Josephine Burr: Articulating Space, showing July 10th through August 7th at 25 Main Street, Concord, MA. In this poetic show, two women ceramic artists with ties to Massachusetts challenge the boundaries of traditional ceramics and contemporary sculpture.

The show is a visual treat with both artists using the age-old technique of coiling and pinching to create their forms yet producing very different work.  Their work is contemporary—taking unusual shapes, embracing light in new ways, and shifting the expected boundaries of artist, object, viewer, and artistic convention. Lily Fein, working intuitively, makes soft, undulating forms suggesting or relating to the human body. Fein’s hand is manifestly present yet subsumed by the liveliness of her pieces. Josephine Burr gives us objectivity, tempered by the hand.  Beneath the stillness and bare weight of Burr’s practice, a certain temporality and openness appear over time. Serendipitously, both artists’ work shares a similar warm white background.

Lily Fein

Fein’s Venus Series of sculpture alludes to the female form, with a primal and elemental sensibility. She shows her ‘guts’ with Half Venus, the torso of the contemporary woman-- a woman who unabashedly flaunts her many colors. Originally an esoteric functional potter, Fein is now a sculptor making increasingly larger work, not afraid to push the envelope with content.

Burr’s Still Life Sculptures with Clay Drawings are magical and tantalizing.  Her open ended large “Volumes”, play on the closed form, bringing us back to an early industrial time when human touch was so much a part what was done.

The two artists have long connections with Lucy Lacoste Gallery.  Josephine Burr began showing with LLG in 2003 and has been presented in numerous art fairs over the years. 

Lily Fein, introduced in 2018 is now represented by LLG and had her first solo, In Response to George E. Ohr in 2020.

While her pieces often evoke bodily forms, she sometimes challenges this metaphor “so that the distinctions between the interior or exterior of the vessel invert, touch, or disappear,” she says.

 “I encourage the objects to morph and change as I create them, developing a language of improvisation that gives form to a stream-of-consciousness approach to making. I am interested in how a clay form can capture, imply or perpetuate movement… defying the nature of the role we’re taught [that] objects occupy in our world.”  

A 2016 graduate of Syracuse University, Fein has won numerous awards; held residencies in Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, and Japan; and exhibited in Louisiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York, Oregon, Montana, and Washington State. Born in Newton, MA, Fein currently resides in New Orleans.

Josephine Burr
Burr, a professor of ceramics at Massachusetts College of Art and Design, raises questions of interiority and objecthood (or: duration/temporality), according to Lucy Lacoste, the gallery owner. “Some of her pieces are unusually large for ceramics—and she sometimes punches holes in the clay to allow light—and her own energy—to shine through.”

Burr explains that the “language” of clay is “mute and absorbent… a holder of time and of the unnoticed, of the underpinnings of consciousness and of daily life.” In her work, she probes at this “unnoticed space, coaxing the temporary and fleeting quality of experience into visible, tactile form.” 

Her sculptures “echo familiar objects but confound their meaning—pinched to hold passing time, shifting light, the fragile uncertainty of being,” she says.  “Boundaries are intentionally blurred: between interior and exterior space; between pot and sculpture; between object and drawing.

“While clay as a material speaks of the familiar, the concrete and the immutable,” she says, “it also carries a sense of transition, fragility and porousness.” For Burr, “making becomes an act of tactile listening, attending fully to that fragile terrain at the edge of perception… Balance and trust are essential to this process. It is my hope that the work invites the viewer to recognize and rest in that space.” 

Burr’s latest approach embraces and interrogates the boundaries of both two- and three-dimensional work. In her ‘still life’ An alphabet of makeshift days, #2 (winter light)—three small sculptural vessels rest on a shelf, a clay ring set against the wall, behind—Burr invites the viewer to consider the continuity and difference between her own work and the art historical lexicon. 

Professor Burr, who lives in Hyde Park, MA, has held residencies and/or exhibited in Massachusetts, Maine, Houston, Philadelphia, New York, Texas, Vermont and Iceland. She is a 2021 nominee for the Boston Foundation’s Brother Thomas Fellowship. 

Lacoste is “delighted to share the work of two insightful artists who are making important contributions to the increasingly synergistic worlds of ceramics and sculpture,” she says.

Articulating Space will be open through August 7, 2021. Both Fein and Burr will attend the opening reception on July 10th from 3 – 5 PM, with artists’ remarks at 4 PM.

Articulating Space will transition to an online exhibition on Saturday, July 17th to accommodate gallery renovations.

 

We intite you to join us for the Opening Reception, with both artists preset speaking about their work, July 10th from 3-5. Remarks at 4pm; refreshments will be served!

Lily Fein 

"Clay excites me for its immediate and direct response to touch as I coil and pinch layers of porcelain to create vessels imbued with the intimacy of the finger-marked surface. The objects I create use the vessel as a metaphor for the body, sometimes inverting and challenging this metaphor so that the distinction between the interior or exterior of the vessel invert, touch, or disappear.

I encourage the objects to morph and change as I create them, developing a language of improvisation that gives form to a stream of consciousness approach to making. I am interested in how a clay form can capture and imply movement. The curves and twists of the objects evoke sensuality that is in the spirit of the making. Clay holds these spontaneous moments as well as the rhythm of the process. The figermarks never cease throughout the pot and the glazes I use enhance this captured movement. I strive for the sculptural vessels to feel alive, as if they are still in motion.

Gestation and rhythm are some of the traits a ceramic thing can hold. Repeated gestures on the surface of a pot or touch carried on throughout a vessel can make a still object retain life. The breath of the vessel is so wonderful in part because it defies the nature of the role we’re taught objects occupy in our world. The vessel is inherently fertile, it gives new life continually, engages us to the point of wondering where it is going next, the eyes it will reach, how its form will change as the sun comes down, and I strive to create objects that perpetuate this vibrancy."

 

Josephine Burr 

"From my perspective, the language of clay is mute and absorbent.  It exists as a foundation, a constant and yet invisible presence – as pot, as brick, as toilet and basin, as earth.  I respond to its silence and its capacity.  It is a holder of time and of the unnoticed, of the underpinnings of consciousness and of daily life.

In my work, I am interested in probing at this unnoticed space, coaxing the temporal and fleeting quality of experience into visible, tactile form.  

The objects and installations I make echo familiar objects, but confound their meaning.  They are metaphorical containers, pinched to hold passing time, shifting light, the fragile uncertainty of being.  Boundaries are intentionally blurred: between interior and exterior space; between pot and sculpture; between object and drawing.  It is what happens at these blurred edges that interests me.  

In my approach to form and color, I seek a spiritual and emotional language that is both spare and full.  Like poetry, this language is non-linear and intuitive – the color of a sudden flock of birds; the shape of an exhale.

Clay as a material speaks of the familiar, the concrete and the immutable, while simultaneously carrying a sense of transition, fragility and porousness.  I am constantly interested in engaging the tension between these qualities.  Making becomes an act of tactile listening, attending fully to that fragile terrain at the edge of perception.  The path to completing each piece is a felt process, responding to the material in my hand and leaning into my own uncertainty.  Balance and trust are essential to this process.  It is my hope that the work invites the viewer to recognize and rest in that space."

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